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Read More 12/09/2017 - 26/10/2017
Gresham College was founded in 1597 and has been providing free lectures within the City of London...  
Read More 14/07/2017 - 06/10/2017
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Like a child with a new toy, HV is super excited that the The Postal Mueum & Mail Rail fully opens on...  
Read More 27/09/2017 - 26/10/2017
FREE Lectures from Gresham College 27 Sep    Discovering the Port of Roman...  
Read More 14/07/2017 - 28/08/2017
  Gangsters, Gelato & Garibaldi with Jo and...  

FREE Lectures: The Thames & The Romans

Tue 12 September 2017 - Thu 26 October 2017

Gresham College was founded in 1597 and has been providing free lectures within the City of London for over 400 years.

The College was established out of the Will of Sir Thomas Gresham, one of the most influential and important men across the Tudor and Elizabethan periods. Sir Thomas made himself indispensible as the financial agent for four successive monarchs from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I. As well as founding the Royal Exchange, Sir Thomas left proceeds in his Will for the foundation of the College in his name.

Today the College continues a four-century-old tradition of providing free public lectures within London. All of the College's 130 and more lectures and events each year are free and open to all. Booking is not generally required, but for a few lectures which do require it are all clearly marked.

 

12 Sep    Sir Thomas Gresham Book Launch and Programme Launch 6:00pm BIH
Dr Valerie Shrimplin

Attend the launch of the new 2017-18 Academic Year, combined with the launch of the illustrated booklet that has been produced about Sir Thomas Gresham.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.

Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

 

13 Sep    From Royal Highway to Common Sewer: The River Thames and Its Architecture 6:00pm Museum of London
Professor Simon Thurley

The Thames is the reason that London is where it is and the river has had a decisive influence on the growth of the city since Roman Times. For 500 years it was the only reliable way to move about but in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries changes came that were to alter the face of London and transform our relationship with the river.

 

27 Sep    Discovering the Port of Roman London 1:00pm Museum of London
Dr Gustav Milne

Roman London was founded on the banks of the Thames to take advantage of the tidal river for traffic trade and communications. But precisely where were the bridge and the harbour, and what did they look like?

The remains of Roman vessels had been found at County Hall, in Southwark and at Blackfriars, but no sign of the port itself. Then, from 1973 onwards, in a long series of major archaeological excavations within the City, the ancient harbour was gradually revealed, often where it was least expected.

 

28 Sep    Cleaning Up The Thames 6:00pm BIH
Carolyn Roberts

The Thames is often hailed as an international success story. Engineering works solved 19th century sewage problems, improving Londoners' health. Salmon, otters and birdlife are now reported to be flourishing along the Thames and the waterfront has been reinvigorated with new buildings. On the other hand, Thames Water PLC has been heavily fined for environmental offences that compromised human health, contaminated land and affected ecosystems. Levels of chemicals in river water are high.

Will the Thames Tideway tunnel solve flooding and pollution?

 

10 Oct  Roman London's First Voices 1pm  Museum of London

Dr Roger Tomlin

Excavations have recently uncovered much evidence of Roman London, including fragments of 405 waxed stylus writing-tablets that can be dated to AD 50-90. 

Roger Tomlin explains how he deciphered the tablets and what can be learned from them. They include the City's first financial document, dated 8 January 57; a contract for the transport of provisions from Verulamium (St Albans); business letters; complaints; and loans. 92 of London's earliest residents are named, including businessmen, merchants, brewers and soldiers.

 

26 Oct How to Spot a Roman Emporer 6-7pm Museum of London

Prof Mary Beard

Mary Beard, Professor of Classics at the Univeristy of Cambridge, Fellow of Newnham College, and Royal Academy of Arts Professor of Ancient Literature - who is also well-known for her media appearances - will speak on the fascinating topic of images of Roman Emperors.

As well as being the Annual Royal Historical Society's Colin Matthew Lecture, the talk is also linked to the City of London's Roman Festival in Autumn 2017.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.